Maarten Maartensz

  Philosophy - Mill - Representative Government - TOC

 


 

This is the Table Of Contents (TOC) of this html-edition of Mill's "Considerations on Representative Government", that was first published in 1861.


Chapters Notes
     Preface
 1: To what extent Forms of Government are a Matter of Choice Ch 1
 2: The Criterion of a Good Form of Government Ch 2
 3: That the ideally best Form of Government is Representative Government Ch 3
 4: Under what Social Conditions Representative Government is Inapplicable Ch 4
 5: Of the Proper Functions of Representative Bodies Ch 5
 6: Of the Infirmities and Dangers to which Representative Government is Liable Ch 6
 7: Of True and False Democracy; Representation of All, and Representation of the Majority only. Ch 7
 8: Of the Extension of the Suffrage Ch 8
 9: Should there be Two Stages of Election? Ch 9
10: Of the Mode of Voting Ch 10
11: Of the Duration of Parliaments Ch 11
12: Ought Pledges to be Required from Members of Parliament? Ch 12
13: Of a Second Chamber Ch 13
14: Of the Executive in a Representative Government Ch 14
15: Of Local Representative Bodies Ch 15
16: Of Nationality, as connected with Representative Government Ch 16
17: Of Federal Representative Governments Ch 17
18: Of the Government of Dependencies by a Free State Ch 18

This html-edition follows the paper version of H.B. Acton's 1972-edition of "Considerations on Representative Government", except that it contains considerably more empty lines between Mill's paragraphs. This is to make the text easier to read. The details of the paper edition, that is well worth buying if you are interested in Mill, is 

John Stuart Mill: Utilitarianism, On Liberty and Considerations on Representative Government Edited by H.B. Acton (ISBN 0 460 11482 4).

This is in Everyman's Library.

The texts that follow have many links, and come all with a group of usually four arrows at the beginning and the end of each text, that look thus:
                                                   
These have in general the following effect when clicked:

- previous file
- Table of Contents
- Notes or Text associated with the file
- next file

Every file of Mill's text links to a file with my notes, the links to which are between square brackets, as in "[1]". In order to allow the reader to read my notes independently, they all start with a quotation in blue of the passage they annotate, and that generally ends with the link to the note in Mill's text.

In contrast, Mill's own notes are indicated by a "M" and are made superscript, like so[M1].

Because the passages I annotate are repeated in my Notes, it is possible to read the Notes without reading the Text that is annotated. However, each file of Notes has at its beginning a link to the Text it annotates, and likewise that Text has at its beginning a link to my Notes to it, and as explained each Note also has a link to the Text and the place is is quoted from

Those who download my edition of Mill's "On Liberty" and my notes should realize that the links to and from the notes are retained only if they are placed in directory-structures of the following form:

     "/Government"             - that includes Mill's textfiles and the TOC
     "/Government/Notes/"   - that includes my textfiles of notes

How this directory and its subdirectory are otherwise attached to a filesystem on the computer you use is irrelevant, but the above is required for having the many links work when reading off line.

Also, it may be remarked that the reading of my Notes may be preferable for  many to the reading of Mill's text, because my Notes very likely contain all or most of the best bits of Mill's text in quotation, while Mill's text, both in the html I found and the paper version I use, is very sparse with interlineation, while the text contains many long sentences and arguments crammed in very long uninterlined paragraphs.


Maarten Maartensz
December 1, 2006.


Chapters Notes
     Preface
 1: To what extent Forms of Government are a Matter of Choice Ch 1
 2: The Criterion of a Good Form of Government Ch 2
 3: That the ideally best Form of Government is Representative Government Ch 3
 4: Under what Social Conditions Representative Government is Inapplicable Ch 4
 5: Of the Proper Functions of Representative Bodies Ch 5
 6: Of the Infirmities and Dangers to which Representative Government is Liable Ch 6
 7: Of True and False Democracy; Representation of All, and Representation of the Majority only. Ch 7
 8: Of the Extension of the Suffrage Ch 8
 9: Should there be Two Stages of Election? Ch 9
10: Of the Mode of Voting Ch 10
11: Of the Duration of Parliaments Ch 11
12: Ought Pledges to be Required from Members of Parliament? Ch 12
13: Of a Second Chamber Ch 13
14: Of the Executive in a Representative Government Ch 14
15: Of Local Representative Bodies Ch 15
16: Of Nationality, as connected with Representative Government Ch 16
17: Of Federal Representative Governments Ch 17
18: Of the Government of Dependencies by a Free State Ch 18