-

Previous IndexNL Next

Nederlog
Aug 5, 2011           

Crisis: Quotations and crisis

prev crisis Next


1. Quotations: There is an update of the Quotations in the Philosophical Dictionary and here:

Quotations






 

 


The update is a bit better than yesterday's and will again be more improved and extended later, but in the version of Quotations in the Philosophical Dictionary rather than in Nederlog, although I will mention important updates. If you liked yesterday's, you want today's, possibly in the version of Quotations in the Philosophical Dictionary, for that last one is just the quotations.

It works and has been tested in Firefox, Seamonkey and MS Explorer, but I should add that the versions do not display identically in the different browsers; that in my version 5 of Firefox with the latest Noscript the above doesn't work when I am online, but does work when started from the harddisk; while it all does work as it should, offline and online, in Seamonkey, and apparently also, but with a bit different display, in MS IE.

As to the changes as compared with yesterday's version: I removed typos in the quotes,  improved the numbering and made the tool a bit larger, but otherwise I didn't change much.

I did add four quotes of Keynes and two of Hazlitt (use Last and Prev in Quotations if you want to see them) in view of my second and last subject:

2. Crisis

I started the Crisis-series (this is a link, in Dutch, and most I wrote on this is in Dutch) nearly three years ago. We're three years further and yesterday the stockmarket plummeted downwards again, while most that has happened the last three years seems to have involved (i) making the bankmanagers and rich even richer (ii) make the middle class and poor pay the debts they made, and while doing this "to save the economy" destroy the welfare state, medicare and social security.

Also, the problems now are much larger than they were in 2008:

  • There is no money for another rescue operations if the stockmarket crashes again
  • The US economy is a lot weaker than in 2008, and the dollar is a lot less strong
  • In Europe, Greece, Portugal, Italy and Ireland - at least - are in very serious problems
  • Those in charge, whether politicians, bankmanagers or state bureaucrats are mostly corrupt or incompetent (it tends to be the worst rather than the best who want to be politicians or bureaucrats, both in - nominal - democracies and in other political systems: The really competent run their own firms or are academics or artists).

Since I fear the last point is the root of the problem, I ended Quotations today with a favourite of mine of Hazlitt:

If mankind had wished for what is right, they might have had it long ago. The theory is plain enough; but they are prone to mischief, 'to every good work reprobate.'
   -- Hazlitt

For reasons why I think so, and some background on humanity and its politics and politicians and their very willing servants and executioners, the bureaucrats see e.g. here

The last two require a social revolution, I'm afraid, but then I'm afraid the current leaderships and current bureaucracies are incompetent, dishonest, and only there for their own benefit, covered and motivated by human-all-too-human weaknesses Hazlitt saw and phrased so well:

Corporate bodies are more corrupt and profligate than individuals, because they have more power to do mischief, and are less amenable to disgrace or punishment. They feel neither shame, remorse, gratitude, nor goodwill. The principle of private or natural conscience is extinguished in each individual (we have no moral sense in the breasts of others), and nothing is considered but how the united efforts of the whole (released from idle scruples) may be best directed to the obtaining of political advantages and privileges to be shared as common spoil. Each member reaps the benefit, and lays the blame, if there is any, upon the rest. The esprit de corps becomes the ruling passion of every corporate body, compared with which the motives of delicacy or decorum towards others are looked upon as being both impertinent and improper.

   -- Hazlitt On corporate bodies

Then again, if the majority of the stupid or egoistic have the democratic right to elect the corrupt, the incompetent, the lying, the careerists, the bullshitters, the impostors, in brief: mostly the worst rather than the best of society to rule society, what one can expect is a major mess and much misery, just like in the 20th Century, but - I fear - rather a lot worse: More people, more and better weapons, better technology to repress, fewer natural resources ... if things go wrong and spiral out of control, they will go wrong on a major scale, and probably will remain so for a long time.

And if Western society collapses, mostly because of the incompetence of its leaders, the folks in the US are a lot better of than in Europe: In the US, citizens can buy weapons, and need not be the slaves of incompetent governors; in Europe, the complete citizenship in nearly all countries is the effective slave (subservient, defenseless, gun fodder) of the bureacrats (military, police, secret service) who work for the leaders of the state.

For more on these lines, see

But we shall see. (For those who desire optimism or good cheer: it would surely help to see or have seen any honest and intelligent and competent politician or bureaucrat, these last 40 years, but I was not thus blessed.)

prev crisis Next


P.S. Corrections, if any are necessary, have to be made later.




As to ME/CFS (that I prefer to call ME):


1.  Anthony Komaroff Ten discoveries about the biology of CFS (pdf)
2.  Malcolm Hooper THE MENTAL HEALTH MOVEMENT: 
PERSECUTION OF PATIENTS?
3.  Hillary Johnson The Why
4.  Consensus of M.D.s Canadian Consensus Government Report on ME (pdf)
5.   Eleanor Stein Clinical Guidelines for Psychiatrists (pdf)
6.  William Clifford The Ethics of Belief
7.  Paul Lutus

Is Psychology a Science?

8.  Malcolm Hooper Magical Medicine (pdf)
9.
 Maarten Maartensz
ME in Amsterdam - surviving in Amsterdam with ME (Dutch)
10.
 Maarten Maartensz Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

Short descriptions of the above:                

1. Ten reasons why ME/CFS is a real disease by a professor of medicine of Harvard.
2. Long essay by a professor emeritus of medical chemistry about maltreatment of ME.
3. Explanation of what's happening around ME by an investigative journalist.
4. Report to Canadian Government on ME, by many medical experts.
5. Advice to psychiatrist by a psychiatrist who understands ME is an organic disease
6. English mathematical genius on one's responsibilities in the matter of one's beliefs:

7. A space- and computer-scientist takes a look at psychology.
8. Malcolm Hooper puts things together status 2010.
9. I tell my story of surviving (so far) in Amsterdam with ME.
10. The directory on my site about ME.



See also: ME -Documentation and ME - Resources
The last has many files, all on my site to keep them accessible.
 


        home - index - top - mail