Nederlog

 

 April 24, 2011

 

More Hazlitt: Principles of Human Action


 

  "A good book is the precious life-
   blood of a master-spirit"
      (Milton)

Today I uploaded the first html-version of William Hazlitt's (the link in the title opens it)


AN ESSAY

ON THE


PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN

ACTION:



BEING AN ARGUMENT IN FAVOUR OF

THE NATURAL DISINTERESTEDNESS

OF THE HUMAN MIND.



TO WHICH ARE ADDED

SOME REMARKS ON THE SYSTEMS OF
HARTLEY AND HELVETIUS.
 

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR J. JOHNSON, NO. 72, ST. PAUL'S
CHURCH-YARD


 1805

 


It was neither easy to do nor is it completely faithful to the original printed text, but I do not have a paper copy or photocopy of that work, and I had to do with the mess Google made of it.

Here is the start of it, that follows the titlepage, and heads a html-file of 233 Kb, to have it all in one file:


Introduction:

At present this is a Work In Progress:

I am working from the scanned version of Google, which consists of photographs of pages in a pdf-format, not of editable text, and a textfile, apparently generated by a program form those photographs.

Both are pretty atrocious:

  • On each page there's Google's logo, as a constant tacit ownership claim (possibly in the future, but implicitly there by logo)

  • In the first 141 pages some 8 are missing in the pdf version

  • The text that comes with it as Hazlitt's is horribly garbled (and varies with the quality of the images of the pages it seems derived from)

So this is not easy... at present I am in this first html-edition at the end of An Essay on the Principes of Human Action, properly speaking, after which starts Remarks on the Systems of Hartley and Helvetius.

If you get the pdf file you get a mostly readable - not all: where you meet in this text "[?]" it stands for a missing word that I can't make out from either text - text, but with at least 8 missing pages; the textfile that can be downloaded with it is totally useless and not independently readable without the pdf.

Hence it will take more time, effort and energy on my part to get a html-text, which I want to make so that I can comment on it.

Incidentally, it is similar with my edition of Hazlitt's Political Essays, for the same reason.

As to the present html-edition, here are three principles I have tried to abide by:

  • I kept the original pagination and ends of line of the main text, and

  • as in Hazlitt's text, I reproduce the footnotes - some long, extending over several subsequent pages - on the page in smaller letters, and indented relative to the main text, but I have not tried to retain the
    lines as I tried to do for the main text (that accordingly is like the book and the pdf-images of its pages)

  • I have paragraphed by adding an empty line. This is not as in the text, but is easier to read on the screen, and does not cost paper on the screen.

And I have done my best to reproduce all of Hazlitt's text, but have failed in some cases, because either the pages are missing in the pdf I used, or else text could not be read or fairly guessed by me.

Finally, at a few points I have edited diplomatically, that is, corrected obvious mistakes by Hazlitt or his printers without providing a note or a "sic".

Apr 24, 2011
MM


I will have more to say on Google's style of appropriating classic texts, and the loving care they manage to not spend on it at all, and their sickening logo they put on every page, and the creepy pictures of  rubber gloved hands they manage to include in their pdf-s, and I will have also have more to say on the text, that I intend to comment as I have done with other classics; and finally I also hope to convert the Remarks on the Systems of Hartley and Helvetius to html, but all of this must be done, if at all, at some future date.

As it is, the present edition of the text, missing pages and unclear words and all, is by far the best on the internet - is my guess, which has a high probability.

For the moment, I probably spend more time and trouble on producing this text than Hazlitt's original printers, all thanks to Google.


P.S. Corrections, if any are necessary, have to be made later.

O yes, as to Google:

- X  :"Be glad it is there!"
- M :"Well... ever heard the old saw "If it's worth doing it's worth
        doing well"?!


As to ME/CFS (that I prefer to call ME):

1. Anthony Komaroff

Ten discoveries about the biology of CFS (pdf)

2. Malcolm Hooper THE MENTAL HEALTH MOVEMENT:  
PERSECUTION OF PATIENTS?
3. Hillary Johnson

The Why

4. Consensus (many M.D.s) Canadian Consensus Government Report on ME (pdf)
5. Eleanor Stein

Clinical Guidelines for Psychiatrists (pdf)

6. William Clifford The Ethics of Belief
7. Paul Lutus

Is Psychology a Science?

8. Malcolm Hooper Magical Medicine (pdf)

Short descriptions:

1. Ten reasons why ME/CFS is a real disease by a professor of medicine of Harvard.
2. Long essay by a professor emeritus of medical chemistry about maltreatment of ME.
3. Explanation of what's happening around ME by an investigative journalist.
4. Report to Canadian Government on ME, by many medical experts.
5. Advice to psychiatrist by a psychiatrist who understands ME is an organic disease
6. English mathematical genius on one's responsibilities in the matter of one's beliefs:
   "it is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence".
7. A space- and computer-scientist takes a look at psychology.
8. Malcolm Hooper puts things together status 2010.
 


    "Ah me! alas, pain, pain ever, forever!

No change, no pause, no hope! Yet I endure.
I ask the Earth, have not the mountains felt?
I ask yon Heaven, the all-beholding Sun,
Has it not seen? The Sea, in storm or calm,
Heaven's ever-changing Shadow, spread below,
Have its deaf waves not heard my agony?
Ah me! alas, pain, pain ever, forever!
"
     - (Shelley, "Prometheus Unbound") 


    "It was from this time that I developed my way of judging the Chinese by dividing them into two kinds: one humane and one not. "
     - (Jung Chang)

 


See also: ME -Documentation and ME - Resources


Maarten Maartensz (M.A. psy, B.A. phi)

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